Friday, February 26, 2021
No menu items!

2020 videos show Marjorie Taylor Greene supporting QAnon – two years AFTER ‘stopping believing’ #Englishheadline

Must Read

Bikini-clad Rita Ora frolics with a male companion in Sydney following her 14-day quarantine #Englishheadline

Rita Ora has been making the most of her time in Sydney after travelling Down Under to star...

How a global epilepsy initiative is helping to heal children #Englishheadline

Levi Trowbridge was just 3 days old and newly released from the maternity ward when he went into...


Newly resurfaced videos and social media posts have shown Marjorie Taylor Greene openly supporting QAnon and praising its ‘patriotic sentiment’ in 2020 – two years after she claims she ‘walked away’ from the conspiracy theory.  

A Facebook Live video posted by Greene on October 2 last year shows the freshman congresswoman slamming a House resolution that condemned QAnon, with Greene calling the move ‘a concern.’

In separate footage of an interview on ABC News 9 in July that year, Greene refuses to denounce the conspiracy theory and says she has ‘only ever seen patriotic sentiment coming out of’ it.

The Republican lawmaker was stripped of her assignments on the Education and Labor Committee and Budget Committee in a House vote Thursday as it emerged she had pushed unfounded conspiracy theories and showed support for executing top Democrats before being elected to Congress. 

Greene tried to distance herself from many of her past comments including her association with QAnon in a speech on the House floor ahead of the vote. 

In it, she claimed she ‘stumbled across’ the debunked extreme right wing conspiracy theory at the end of 2017 when ‘things in the news… didn’t make sense to me’ and became ‘very interested’ in it.   

Greene claimed her belief was short-lived and that she stopped believing in QAnon the following year when she learned it was ‘lies’.

‘Later in 2018, when I started finding misinformation, lies, things that were not true in these QAnon posts, I stopped believing it,’ she told her fellow lawmakers, adding that she then ‘walked away from those things.’  

But resurfaced footage shows Greene supporting QAnon as recently as October last year.  

Newly resurfaced videos and social media posts have shown Marjorie Taylor Greene openly supporting QAnon and praising its 'patriotic sentiment' in 2020 - two years after she claims she 'walked away' from the conspiracy theory

Newly resurfaced videos and social media posts have shown Marjorie Taylor Greene openly supporting QAnon and praising its ‘patriotic sentiment’ in 2020 – two years after she claims she ‘walked away’ from the conspiracy theory

In the Facebook Live video still available on her account Greene is seen blasting a House resolution condemning QAnon and its conspiracy theories saying it is a ‘great concern’. 

‘I want to tell you about a resolution that was passed by the House of Representatives today and it gives me great concern,’ she tells the camera. 

‘And this resolution 1154 is condemning QAnon and rejecting the conspiracy theories it promotes,’ she says, adding ‘that is what this resolution is about.’

Greene later uses air quotes around the term ‘conspiracy theories’ when talking about QAnon’s extremist beliefs – a hand gesture typically used to show sarcasm. 

‘Here’s why I have great concern,’ she says, before launching into a rant that the House had not passed resolutions condemning Antifa or Black Lives Matter. 

‘The House of Representatives led by Nancy Pelosi is yet to pass a resolution condemning communist Antifa and Marxist BLM who have literally burned our cities,’ she says.

Greene once again says she thinks it is a ‘serious concern’ that the move was made in relation to QAnon. 

‘Our Congress which is funded by American taxpayers hard-earned dollars passed a resolution today condemning QAnon and the ‘conspiracy theories’ it promotes but they do not pass a resolution condemning domestic terrorist groups specifically Antifa and BLM,’ she says.

A Facebook Live video posted by Greene on October 2 last year shows the freshman congresswoman slamming a House resolution that condemned QAnon, with Greene calling the move 'a concern'

A Facebook Live video posted by Greene on October 2 last year shows the freshman congresswoman slamming a House resolution that condemned QAnon, with Greene calling the move ‘a concern’

‘Now I think that should give every single American serious concern.’ 

In a second resurfaced video of a July 2020 interview with NewsChannel 9’s Josh Roe, Greene described QAnon as ‘patriotic sentiment’ and a ‘source’ of information but refused to say whether or not she believed in it.  

When asked if she was a follower of QAnon, Greene did not denounce the conspiracy theory and just avoided the question.

‘I’m just like millions of people here in our country and millions of people aroid the world who are very much concerned about a deep state and our government,’ she said.

‘And it’s something you hear talked about every day.’  

Greene said she ‘started watching things’ as she didn’t like the media being ‘so slanted.’

‘I’m one of those ordinary people who started watching things and started seeing on the news non stop Russian collusion, Russian collusion but yet there were other stories that were also easy to find that were showing it wasn’t true so I’m just someone who doesn’t like news or media being so slanted,’ she said.

Greene described turning to ‘other sources’.  

‘There are just a lot of people like me who got really tired of [the media] so it’s easy to look at other sources,’ she said. 

Roe responded that he ‘didn’t really get a yes or no answer’ and asked Greene if she believed ‘Q is a patriot’ – something she previously said in a YouTube video.  

‘I’ve only ever seen patriotic sentiment coming out of that source and other sources,’ Greene replied, before hitting out at ‘big tech’ over ‘censorship.’

She said big tech had ‘censored tremendously’ the ‘source’ QAnon.  

In separate footage of an interview on ABC News 9 in July that year, Greene refuses to denounce the conspiracy theory and says she has 'only ever seen patriotic sentiment coming out of' it

In separate footage of an interview on ABC News 9 in July that year, Greene refuses to denounce the conspiracy theory and says she has ‘only ever seen patriotic sentiment coming out of’ it

She went on to say that Twitter was removing accounts connected to QAnon despite there 'not being any dangerous rhetoric coming out of people like that'

She went on to say that Twitter was removing accounts connected to QAnon despite there ‘not being any dangerous rhetoric coming out of people like that’

‘There’s a lot of censorship from big tech on social media and this is the type of censorship that Americans are so tied of and that is a particular source that gets censored tremendously,’ she said.

She went on to say that Twitter was removing accounts connected to QAnon despite there ‘not being any dangerous rhetoric coming out of people like that.’  

QAnon symbols and prominent supporters of it were among the violent Trump-supporting mob that stormed the US Capitol on January 6 in a riot that left five – including a Capitol cop – dead. 

The far-right QAnon conspiracy theory claims Satan-worshipping pedophiles are plotting against Donald Trump and are running a global child sex trafficking ring. 

Greene sought to distance herself from the conspiracy theory Thursday telling lawmakers she ‘never once said during my entire campaign ‘QAnon” and that she stopped following it in 2018.  

She claimed she had ‘regret’ over her association with QAnon because it had led to the calls for her removal from House committees. 

She said she ‘stumbled’ across it in 2017 and then started posting things about it online. 

‘I posted about it on Facebook. I read about it, I talked about it, I asked questions about it.

‘The problem with that is, though, is I was allowed to believe things that weren’t true, and I would ask questions about them and talk about them, and that is absolutely what I regret,’ she said. 

Greene tried to distance herself from many of her past comments including her association with QAnon in a speech on the House floor (above) ahead of the vote claiming she 'walked away' from the conspiracy theory in 2018

Greene tried to distance herself from many of her past comments including her association with QAnon in a speech on the House floor (above) ahead of the vote claiming she ‘walked away’ from the conspiracy theory in 2018 

‘Because if it weren’t for the Facebook posts and comments that I liked in 2018, I wouldn’t be standing here today, and you couldn’t point a finger and accuse me of anything wrong.’ 

As well as QAnon, Greene also tried to backpedal on a number of her other comments and conspiracy theories on the House floor.

The Georgia Republican said ‘9/11 absolutely happened,’ and that ‘school shootings are real,’ disclaiming two of the bizarre claims which led to calls for her expulsion from office.  

‘School shootings are absolutely real,’ she said.

‘I know the fear that David Hogg had that day,’ she added, referring to the Parkland shooting survivor who she was filmed harassing in footage that surfaced last week.

This came after she previously sad Parkland was a ‘false flag’.  

She did not however offer an apology to Hogg Thursday.  

She also insisted ‘9/11 absolutely happened’ and ‘it’s a tragedy for anyone to say it didn’t happen,’ after she previously pushed a conspiracy that no plane flew into the Pentagon on September 11.  

Greene has repeatedly pushed other unfounded conspiracy theories including that late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was replaced by a body double, the 2017 Las Vegas massacre that left 58 dead was organized by Democrats and that there is no evidence a hijacked plane hit the Pentagon on 9/11.  

A video of Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene confronting a then 18-year-old David Hogg about gun reform in Washington D.C. in March 2019, emerged last week

A video of Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene confronting a then 18-year-old David Hogg about gun reform in Washington D.C. in March 2019, emerged last week

TAYLOR GREENE’S BIZARRE CLAIMS

  • The California Camp Fire which killed at least 85 was caused by a space laser linked to the Rothschilds and the state’s high-speed rail. PG&E admitted it was caused by a faulty power line and went into bankruptcy to fund a $13.5bn settlement and pleaded guilty to manslaughter.
  • Hillary Clinton and Huma Abedin cut off a child’s face while she was alive, Clinton wore it as a mask so the terrified child would produce ‘adrenachrome’ and then organized the killing of a cop who knew about it.
  • The Las Vegas massacre was organized by Democrats to help them ban guns and shooter Stephen Paddock was not a lone wolf.
  • There’s no evidence of a plane hitting the Pentagon on 9/11.
  • The Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School massacre which cost the lives of 17 students was a ‘false flag planned shooting.’
  • I am told that Nancy Pelosi tells Hillary Clinton several times a month that ‘we need another school shooting’ in order to persuade the public to want strict gun control.’
  • Seth Rich leaked Hillary Clinton’s emails and was murdered in revenge by her aide John Podesta because the emails revealed that a D.C. pizza restaurant had a child-smuggling operation in its basement. It does not even have a basement.
  • The world is run by a cabal of Satan-worshiping pedophiles and the Q in QAnon exists and is the ‘best chance to take them out.’
  • Barack Obama and Valerie Jarrett are Muslims. 
  • Ruth Bader Ginsburg was replaced by a body double. 
  • She wasn’t the person who posted a call to assassinate Nancy Pelosi to her own Facebook page. 

 

CNN first reported last week that she had shown support on Facebook for executing top Democrats including Nancy Pelosi in 2018 and 2019.  

Greene had liked a post that said ‘a bullet to the head would be quicker’ to remove Pelosi from office. 

In an April 2018 post of Greene’s on the Iran nuclear deal, Greene responded to a commenter who asked her ‘Now do we get to hang them ?? Meaning H & O???,’ the individual asked, referring to former President Barack Obama and ex-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. 

‘Stage is being set. Players are being put in place. We must be patient. This must be done perfectly or liberal judges would let them off,’ Greene replied.  

Last Friday, Media Matters for America – a left-leaning organization – reported that Greene had appeared on a streaming program for the pro-Trump website UniteAmericaFirst.com in February 2019. 

There she speculated that Ginsburg, the now late Supreme Court justice, was actually a body double. 

‘I do not believe that was Ruth. No. I don’t think so,’ she said, commenting on a photo of Ginsburg at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. 

Media Matters was also the first to report that Greene wrote a Facebook post in November 2018 that she believed California’s deadly Camp Fire was potentially caused by space lasers that were connected to the Rothschilds and former Gov. Jerry Brown to clear the way for a high-speed rail system.   

‘There are too many coincidences to ignore,’ Greene wrote. 

Greene tried to connect the Pacific Gas and Electric Company – whose faulty equipment did start the blaze – through one of its board members to Rothschild Inc., in an anti-Semitic dog whistle. 

The cause of the fire isn’t a mystery as PG&E pleaded guilty of being responsible and will pay out more than $25 billion in damages.    

Another video went viral of Greene following David Hogg, who survived the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, around Capitol Hill before she was a member of Congress. 

During the 2-minute long video, Greene charges Hogg with ‘using kids as a barrier’ and taking money from George Soros. 

Greene asks Hogg why he supported ‘red flag laws that attack our Second Amendment.’ Greene talked about being armed. 

‘If school zones were protected with security guards with guns, there would be no mass shootings, did you know that?’ she tells Hogg.    

The House voted 230-199 Thursday to remove Greene from both her committee assignments. 

All Democrats voted to remove her and 11 Republicans including Representative Adam Kinzinger of Illinois and Brian Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania also crossed partisan lines.  

#Englishheadline



.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest News

More Articles Like This