UK

Author Susan Meachen breaks silence on shock revelation she’s alive 2 years after husband & daughter announced her death #Author #Susan #Meachen #breaks #silence #shock #revelation #shes #alive #years #husband #daughter #announced #death #englishheadline


[title_words_as_hashtags

AN author whose death was announced two years ago has finally broken her silence after she was revealed to be alive.

Susan Meachen, a romance novelist, was reported dead by suicide, according to a Facebook post in a private fan group which appeared to be from her daughter in Ocotber 2020.

Romance author Susan Meachen (pictured) broke her silence after people thought she was dead for two years, saying that the 'book world' was too much to handle with her medical diagnosis

2

Romance author Susan Meachen (pictured) broke her silence after people thought she was dead for two years, saying that the ‘book world’ was too much to handle with her medical diagnosisCredit: TikTok/@susanmeachen
Susan resurfaced this month and seemed to suggest her family was to blame for her death announcement

2

Susan resurfaced this month and seemed to suggest her family was to blame for her death announcementCredit: Twitter/@Draggerofliars

Fellow author Candace Adams exclusively told The U.S. Sun that the person claiming to be Meachen’s daughter said: “the family wanted nothing more to do with the book community, that we were all messed up and it was our fault that her mom was dead.”

The novelist appeared to be deceased for two years, before she made an announcement on January 4.

Susan posted a message where she seemed to suggest her family was to blame for the announcement of her death in 2020.

“I debated on how to do this a million times and still not sure if it’s right or not,” the post read. “My family did what they thought was best for me and I can’t fault them for it.

Idaho 'killer' cherry-picked victims for key reason, expert says
Pete & girlfriend Chase are 'so kind' to neighbors after move to Brooklyn loft

“I am in a good place now and I am hoping to write again. Let the fun begin.”

While speaking to the press for the first time, Susan revealed to the New York Times that the online romance community became hard to bear as she struggled with her new diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

“I think it’s a very dangerous mix-up, especially if you have a mental illness,” she said.

“I would log on and get in, and at some point in the day my two worlds would collide, and it would be hard to differentiate between book world and the real world. It was like they would sandwich together.”

At first, the community was “like an escape, a timeout, a break from everyday reality,” she said.

But as time went on, the “book world,” as she calls it, made her disorder worse.

She said that she would go into a manic state when writing her novels and conflicts on fan pages made her angry inside.

Susan’s husband Troy said that sometimes he would come home to her talking “like a character from a book, like she was the individual she was writing.”

Although she tried to get away from it all, she said it was “an addiction.”

Troy told the NYT that he saw the “book world” as a health risk to his wife.

He claimed that Susan would often get “really brutal” responses when she sent out samples of her work to fellow authors.

“It got to the point where it was like, enough is enough.”

“She was going round and round,” Troy said, “and the bottom was just right there.”

The breaking point for Susan’s family was when Troy found her “not cognitive or responsive” after she took a large dose of Xanax, the family claimed.

This is when Troy told his daughter to announce Susan’s death online, he said.

“I told them that she is dead to the indie world, the internet, because we had to stop her, period,” he said.

“She could not stop it on her own. And, even to this day, I’ll take 100 percent of the blame, the accolades, whatever you want to call it.”

Susan’s former book editor Kasey Hill said it “tore her apart” when she realized her death was a hoax.

Soon after the announcement, Kasey began to question Susan’s death because her Facebook account was promoting her books in a familiar style of writing and spelling.

“I noticed a lot of the things that she was posting, or what was being said or typed in the conversations, and everything looked exactly like how Susan messaged me and how Susan wrote her books,” Kasey explained.

One particular detail was the way Susan allegedly misspelled the word “supposed.”

According to Kasey, Susan had been open about her struggles with mental health online and announced she was leaving the “book world” shortly before her alleged suicide.

“The day before her supposed suicide, she had messaged me asking me for the edits and everything because she was being committed [to a mental health institution] the next day, and that was one of my first red flags,” Kasey said.

AGT: All-Star fans slam ‘overrated’ finalist as Mike Winfield gets Golden Buzzer
Idaho 'killer' cherry-picked victims for key reason, expert says

Kasey tried finding information about Susan’s death online, but could not verify her alleged passing at the time.

The U.S. Sun reached out to Susan for a comment, but a response wasn’t received by the time of publication.



English Headline

Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Most Popular

To Top
%d bloggers like this: